August 20, 2014

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The True Test of Christmas...

Another Christmas memory surfaces...
I was in Wal-Mart yesterday, trying to pick out a $20 filter for the vacuum my wife bought there two years ago...and a replacement belt that they no longer stocked... It was frustrating 'cause somebody else has been there before me, and torn open the packages so you don't know if the belts are in the right bags, and so on. (PS: The bags are zip lock, so you can reseal them... but that didn't stop this guy  from tearing open the sacks below the ziplock.

Anyway, while I'm trying to concentrate on figuring this out, my ears hear the constant wailing of a kid, very much in distress... I try to tune it out, but it's loud and on-going from the next aisle or too... And after brief quite down, the wailing renews, somewhat closer.

I hear the parent telling the kid that he's not being very Xmas like, and the wailing intensifies.
I ALMOST walk around the end of the aisle to confront the kid and tell him that if he doesn't quiet down, they'll be asked to leave the store.... when the crying stops.

I make my selection, and turn to leave, only somewhat pleased with my choice, and I start to pass through the toy section.

There are a couple, trying to discuss or consider a toy or game or two, as the toddler is kicking and wailing in the kid carrier part of the shopping cart, clutching and grabbing at the nearest toy on the shelf. The mom skillfully removes the brightly colored box from his hand and replaces it on the shelf as the wailing starts again, even louder "But I WANT it"....

As I pass the parents, they look like they've had a rough day and are about at their whit's end. I decide NOT to say anything, but as I pass, I hear the mother say to the father, "Gee, now I remember what Christmas was like as a kid!"

It was all I could do to keep from laughing all the way to the check-out register...
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