Trump signs $400 billion budget plan, says Congress needs more Republicans

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WASHINGTON, D.C. (AP) - UPDATE: 2/9/18 9:50 A.M.

The Latest on Congress and spending legislation (all times local):

9:15 a.m.

President Donald Trump is making the case on Twitter for electing more Republicans to Congress after signing a $400 billion spending plan.

Trump says, "Without more Republicans in Congress, we were forced to increase spending on things we do not like or want" to help the U.S. military. He says non-military spending "will never come down" without electing more Republicans in the 2018 elections.

He calls the spending plan a "BIG VICTORY for our Military, but much waste in order to get Dem votes."

He is pointing to upcoming talks on immigration, writing, "Fortunately, DACA not included in this Bill, negotiations to start now!"

Trump's tweets came after Republican Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky blocked plans for a quick Senate vote because of his spending concerns.
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8:40 a.m.

President Donald Trump has signed the budget deal.

Trump tweets, "Just signed Bill. Our Military will now be stronger than ever before. We love and need our Military and gave them everything - and more. First time this has happened in a long time. Also means JOBS, JOBS, JOBS!"

The House narrowly passed the budget accord in the pre-dawn hours, ending a brief government shutdown and clearing a path for huge spending increases for both the Pentagon and domestic programs.

Passage came over the objections Democratic leaders who demanded the promise of a vote to protect "Dreamer" immigrants brought to the country illegally as children.


UPDATE: 2/9/2018 5:30 a.m.

The House has narrowly passed a sweeping bipartisan budget accord, ending an hours-long government shutdown and clearing a path for huge spending increases for both the Pentagon and domestic programs.

The 240-186 vote sends the $400 billion spending plan to President Donald Trump, who has promised to sign it.

Passage of the measure came over the opposition of Democratic leaders who demanded the promise of a vote to protect "Dreamer" immigrants brought to the country illegally as children.

A band of tea party Republicans swung against the legislation as well, repelled by its spiraling spending levels.

The government shut down at midnight Thursday after Kentucky GOP Sen. Rand Paul blocked plans for a quick Senate vote, blaming his fellow Republicans for being "complicit" in the looming return of trillion-dollar budget deficits.



1:50 a.m.

The Senate has passed a massive, bipartisan budget agreement and spending bill to reopen the shuttered federal government.

The bill now moves to the House.

Senators voted 71-28 to approve the deal, easily overcoming objections from Republican fiscal conservatives who say the bill marks a return to unchecked deficit spending.

The bill stalled in the Senate Thursday night when one of the opponents, Sen. Rand Paul, refused to allow a speedy vote.

Paul's protest forced Congress to miss a midnight deadline for passing a funding measure to keep the government operating.



12:55 a.m.

Lawmakers are striving in the pre-dawn hours to reopen the federal government, shuttered since midnight after a rogue Senate Republican blocked a speedy vote on a massive, bipartisan, budget-busting spending deal.

Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul blocked a vote on the $400 billion spending measure, which is married to a six-week temporary funding bill need to prevent the shutdown and provide time to implement the budget pact. Paul was protesting the return of trillion-dollar deficits on the watch of Republicans controlling Washington.

Paul pushed a set of Senate votes into early Friday. The measure, backed by the Senate's top leaders, was expected to sail through the chamber, but the situation is far more dicey in the House, where liberal Democrats and tea party conservatives have swung into opposition.



12:35 a.m.

The Office of Management and Budget has officially ordered the U.S. government closed.

OMB Director Mick Mulvaney issued the order at midnight, notifying federal agencies they should execute their contingency plans.

Mulvaney's notice says federal employees should report to work Friday to "undertake orderly shutdown activities."

He notes that his office is "hopeful that this lapse in appropriations will be of short duration."


12:30 a.m.

Vice President Mike Pence says the Trump administration is "hopeful" the government shutdown that began at midnight will not last long.

Pence is in South Korea, where he is leading the U.S. delegation to the opening ceremonies of the Winter Olympics. He says the White House hopes Congress moves swiftly to approve a two-year budget agreement.

Pence says he has been in contact with the White House legislative office and President Donald Trump about the shutdown, but indicates he hasn't been directly involved in conversations with lawmakers on Capitol Hill.

"Our hope is that the bipartisan agreement reached in the Senate will be passed and sent to the House," Pence says, adding, "We're on standby as the vote approaches."


12:01 a.m.

The federal government has shut down after a quarreling Senate blew a midnight deadline to pass a temporary funding bill.

Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney immediately implemented plans to close non-essential government operations, says spokesman John Czwartacki.

A Senate vote on a stopgap funding bill is expected early Friday morning. A sweeping bipartisan vote is expected on the measure, which is attached to a huge budget agreement, but the timing and outcome of a House vote are less certain.

Essential government functions will continue regardless.

A shutdown - technically a lapse in agency appropriations - became inevitable as GOP Sen. Rand Paul repeatedly held up votes on the budget plan, protesting its likely contribution to budget deficits that are soon to top $1 trillion.


Original Story 2/08/2018

A short government shutdown is assured as the Senate has recessed until just after a Thursday midnight deadline to pass a temporary funding bill.

Kentucky GOP Sen. Rand Paul sparked the shutdown after blocking repeated attempts by GOP leaders to speed up a vote on the stopgap funding bill, which is attached to a huge bipartisan budget agreement.

Paul is protesting that the bill would usher in the return of trillion-dollar budget deficits.

The Senate is likely to vote to reopen the government in the wee hours Friday. A House vote would follow, but it's possible that federal agencies will have to implement temporary shutdown plans if clearing the funding bill takes too long.

Essential government functions will continue regardless.



 
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