Update: Jessie's Law in omnibus bill

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PARKERSBURG, W.Va. (WTAP) - U.S Senator Joe Manchin delivered remarks on the Senate floor Thursday after securing passage of Jessie's Law.

The bill will help ensure that medical professional have full knowledge of their patient's previous opioid addiction, if the patient provides that information.

Senator Manchin says he's proud to get Jessie's Law included in the omnibus bill. He says that will guarantee its passage. It's named in honor of the late Jessie Grubb.

Grubb was from Charleston, West Virginia. She was prescribed opioids following hip surgery in Michigan, even though she was recovering from addiction.

The doctor didn't know that. Manchin says the legislation will save lives.

"It will have more of a direct effect. It could save lives as soon as it is implemented. More than anything done in the bill, even at $1.3 trillion. A lot of people are helped in many different ways, but this language is pertinent, truly, in preventing the tragedy the Grubbs have gone through," said Manchin.

The bill was first introduced two years ago in 2016.


A bipartisan effort to save and protect those recovering from addiction passed the U.S. Senate.

It's called Jessie's Law. It's named in honor of a West Virginian named Jessie Grubb. The late woman had been recovering from addiction when she had to undergo surgery for a running injury. The doctors that treated her claim they didn't know she was a recovering addict. She died after being sent home with a prescription fro 50 oxycodone pills. The legislation is aimed at preventing something like this from happening again.

"Jessie's Law goes a little bit farther in terms of being able to help the physicians and the hospital and the patient have a better outcome. The doctors are an important part of this," said Senator Shelley Moore Capito.

The law helps ensure medical professionals have full knowledge of a patient's previous history of addiction when determining treatment.



 
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