Marietta celebrates 230th anniversary of the signing of the Northwest Ordinance of 1787

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Today marks the 230th anniversary of the signing of the Northwest Ordinance.

Jean Yost, a co-chair of the celebration committee, planned the celebration in Muskingum Park.

The document is considered one of the most important legislative acts of the confederation congress.

It protected civil liberties, outlawed slavery and involuntary servitude in the new territories.

Today's celebration included patriotic music, presentations by the Ohio Supreme Court Justice Judith French, Marietta College President William Rudd, and historian Denver Norman.

The Northwest Ordinance, officially titled "An Ordinance for the Government of the Territory of the United States North West of the River Ohio," was adopted by the Confederation Congress on July 13, 1787.

Also known as the Ordinance of 1787, the Northwest Ordinance established a government for the Northwest Territory, outlined the process for admitting a new state to the Union, and guaranteed that newly created states would be equal to the original thirteen states.

Considered one of the most important legislative acts of the Confederation Congress, the Northwest Ordinance also protected civil liberties and outlawed slavery and involuntary servitude in the new territories.

The Old Northwest is now Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin and part of Minnesota.