UPDATE: Safetytown Starts in Marietta

By: News Email
By: News Email
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UPDATE 6/16/2014 4:40 PM

The flags are out downtown, the kids are excited and learning to stop, look and listen.

It's the first day of Safetytown!

Monday it was all about the road and how to cross it.

Marietta Police are teaching all about road signs.

Everyday the kids learn a new safety rule including fire, boat and bicycle safety.

Rules and safety lessons they will use for the rest of their life

"It gets them ready for kindergarten to get to know some people that may be in their classes, getting to be away from their parents, even just for a short time, it's a good, good thing for them," says Alison Woods, Safetytown lead teacher. "Don't forget the safety rules and remind your kids of them every day and be good role models for your kids too."

There are cool new buildings this year too, partnering with Marietta College.

A Safetytown kid herself, Woods says the community is a big help.

She thanks everyone who's involved and helping out, especially the teen volunteers from the middle school.

And they even get to graduate next Thursday at the high school.


UPDATE 6/5/2014 5:20 PM

Safe fun at Safetytown.

Safetytown is right around the corner.

The free program teaches safety to 5 and 6-year-olds.

Volunteers say it's a lot of fun for kids and it's fun for them too.

"This year I asked them to say the very first rule with me - and the first rule is: stop, look and listen. Use your eyes, use your ears and then you use your feet," says Safetytown co-chair Cheryl Cook.

The Marietta Rotary Club held its 36th annual luncheon Thursday.

Members who donate their time got a little recognition for their hard work.

And they say it's all worth it.

Safetytown starts June 16th this year.

So far, 175 kids have signed up.


UPDATE: 4-24-14 9:00 PM

Its an interactive safety awareness program for children five to seven years old.

The Rotary Club of Marietta is working with Marietta College students on new designs to upgrade Safetytown.

"We do have a community in which people walk and travel on foot or bike a lot and it's very important that we are aware of our children as pedestrians and the children understand what they're to do,” says Abigail Spung, MC adjunct professor of design and vice president and creative director at Offenberger and White.

The rotary is a dedicated group when it comes to Safetytown.

"They're often working collaboratively with their neighbors or with a club or an organization to just try to make it a better place to live,” says Tom Fenton, Safetytown Committee.

It was a very rewarding experience.

"I was so thrilled to be a part of it; it was very challenging and fun – a lot of work, but definitely worth it,” says sophomore Lexi Callaway.

As a faculty member at MC, Spung is all for the students getting involved.

"I want to represent the students at any opportunity and give them opportunity to be out there doing what they do for the community,” she says.

Sophomore Brittany Martin didn't experience childhood in the Valley but understands why people relate to the program.

"Growing up I would want my children to be able to experience something like this, so I thought it was very important to give them something they can look forward to and something to be proud of in their own community,” Martin says.

Everyone likes it and wants to be a part of it.

"The community keeps working to improve it and spread out its benefits to additional kids,” Fenton says.

Safetytown students learn about a variety of situations and what to do to remain safe, including lessons about fire, pedestrians, traffic, water, guns, poison and drugs.

Each child receives a certificate of achievement when they complete Safetytown.
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The program teaches safety lessons to children ready to enter kindergarten.

Thursday the Rotary Club of Marietta had a kickoff luncheon about the collaboration between Marietta College students and the community to upgrade Safetytown.

Abigail Spung, MC adjunct professor of design and vice president and creative director at Offenberger and White says there's a thriving resource at Marietta College providing help to local organizations for the betterment of everyone in our community.

Working with the college, new designs for Safetytown are in the works.

Spung says she was in the second Safetytown ever and remembers it like it was yesterday.

"We do have a community in which people walk and travel on foot or bike a lot and it's very important that we are aware of our children as pedestrians and the children understand what they're to do," she says.

Spung says it takes more than one person to pull something like this off.

And every year Safetytown has more fans and more people on board to help make it even better.


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