WOVA Fox | WOVA-TV

UPDATE: W.Va. Lawmaker Says Many Leaning Against Meth Bill

By: WTAP News, The Associated Press Email
By: WTAP News, The Associated Press Email

UPDATE 2/27/2014 3:30 PM

CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) - A West Virginia legislative chairman says many of his committee members are leaning against making a cold medicine used to cook meth available by prescription only.

House of Delegates Judiciary Committee Chairman Tim Manchin says a bill to make pseudoephedrine prescription only will come up Monday or Tuesday. Manchin said there's a fair amount of opposition in his committee. He said he was struggling with the bill.

The proposal excludes certain drugs deemed tamper-resistant.

Manchin said other options exist if the committee won't pass that version. One would further limit how much pseudoephedrine someone can buy annually.

Del. Don Perdue, a prescription-only advocate, thinks the House would pass the bill if Manchin's committee endorses it.

The Senate approved the proposal Feb. 18. The legislative session ends March 8.

(Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)


UPDATE 2/24/2014 4:45 PM

The West Virginia Senate passed a measure to make cold medicine containing pseudoephedrine a prescription only drug, but now we're learning just how expensive that may be.

A new economics study from West Liberty University says the policy change would cost the state around $146 million over 10 years.

Critics say the bill also attacks civil liberties.

"Every time a criminal uses a consumer product in an inappropriate manner, we can't necessarily punish everyone for the sins of a few," says Sen. Mitch Carmichael. "I think that's what we're doing here. We're making criminals out of law-abiding citizens."

Again, the prescription only bill passed the Senate.

The House of Delegates is now expected to take up the measure.


UPDATE 2/18/2014 4:35 PM

CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) - The West Virginia Senate passed a bill to make drugs used in the production of methamphetamine available only by prescription.

The bill will make pseudoephedrines a Schedule IV prescription drug and exempt medicines that can't easily be converted to meth.

The bill was passed to the House for action.

Before passage, the Senate voted to amend the bill to allow individuals charged with possession of pseudoephedrine, and who purchased the drug legally in another state, to go to court and have charges dropped. Sen. Corey Palumbo explained this process may be used by a person only once.

Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin said he was open to taking a close look at a final bill.

Only Oregon and Mississippi have passed similar laws.

(Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)


UPDATE 2/18/2014 11:40 AM

CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) - The West Virginia Senate is scheduled to vote on a bill to make drugs used in the production of methamphetamine available only by prescription.

The bill would make pseudoephedrines a Schedule IV prescription drug and exempt medicines that can't easily be converted to meth.

The bill was advanced to third reading Monday after two unsuccessful attempts to amend it.

Sen. Evan Jenkins submitted one of the amendments. He proposed allowing individuals to carry up to a week's supply without a prescription. As the bill stands, Jenkins said tourists from other states who purchased Sudafed over-the-counter legally and carried it into West Virginia could be convicted of a misdemeanor.

Only Oregon and Mississippi have passed similar laws.

(Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)


CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) - A state task force says West Virginia should require prescriptions for cold medications that contain an ingredient used illegally to make methamphetamine.

The recommendation is one of several approved Wednesday by the Governor's Advisory Council on Substance Abuse.

The council also recommended that Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin oppose any legislation that would legalize marijuana for medical or recreational use.

Council member the Rev. James Patterson says there's evidence that requiring prescriptions for cold medications containing pseudoephedrine reduces the number of meth labs.

House health committee Chairman Don Perdue says the council's pseudoephedrine recommendation is good news. Perdue plans to introduce such legislation in January.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)


Comments are posted from viewers like you and do not always reflect the views of this station.
powered by Disqus
TheNewsCenter One Television Plaza Parkersburg, WV. 26101 304-485-4588
Copyright © 2002-2014 - Designed by Gray Digital Media - Powered by Clickability 230996701 - thenewscenter.tv/a?a=230996701
Gray Television, Inc.