Flood Analysis

By: Associated Press
By: Associated Press

Consultants say a state task force study of timbering and strip mining is not precise enough to attribute additional damage from last summer's floods to those industries.

The study conducted by state engineers and hydrologists for Governor Wise's Flood Analysis Advisory Committee found that some mining and timbering practices increased the damage by as much as ten percent.

But Rhett Jackson of the University of Georgia says the study isn't precise enough for ten percent to make a real difference.

Matthew Crum, director of mining and reclamation for the state Department of Environmental Protection, says one community experienced a peak increased runoff of as much as 21 percent.

The DEP engineer who headed the technical task force, John Ailes, says the committee's purpose was to determine whether there was an impact and what could be done to prevent future damage.

The task force met today in Nitro and will meet again July 23 to try to achieve a consensus on recommendations to the state legislature.


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